Meal Planner

Meal Planner

Don't forget the fish! Make a weekly meal plan and grocery list using this printable planner before hitting the supermarket. Find four of our favorite new seafood recipes here.

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Explore all of the Better Seafood Board collection of Resources, Downloads, links, and multimedia features.

Did You Know?

Did You Know?FDA States that "White Roughy" not Acceptable Market Name for Basa. NFI received a letter from FDA this past week clarifying the agency's policy for the use of the term "white roughy" for basa fish.

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Did You Know?

basa fish and roughy

White Roughy is not an acceptable Market Name for Basa

In a letter to NFI, FDA clarified the agency’s policy for the use of the term “white roughy” for basa. FDA believes that marketing basa or any other fish in the Pangasiidae family as “white roughy” is misleading to the consumer. Fish known as “roughies” such as “orange roughy” are classified differently from Basa and command a higher value in the marketplace. Misleading fish names violate the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

Better Seafood Board Blog

The cover story for March issue of SeaFood Business, which will be available at the IBSS, is on species substitution.  In the article, Law and Order, Jamie Wright provides a recap of the Boston Globe story and subsequent Massachusetts legislature hearing.  In addition, there is a lengthy interview with Wayne Hettenbach, the senior trial attorney for the Environmental Crimes Section of Department of Justice, who was involved with the recent fraud cases and an excellent summary of some of the convictions. 

This story, along with the Point of View column, You’ve Been Warned, which was in the February issue of Seafood Business, should be a reality check for everyone in the seafood supply chain.  No matter where you are in the supply chain, species substitution is against the law and when caught the penalties are real.

03/08/2012 - 12:07 0 Read More

Lost in all the press generated by the Boston Globe 2-part series on species substitution at Boston-area restaurants and Oceania’s report on substitution at Boston-area grocery stores is a story from another large seafood-centric city – Seattle.  The local NPR affiliate (KPLU 88.5) reports on the efforts of Washington state’s Fish and Wildlife police to look for mislabeled species at area food markets.  

Budget cuts and other assigned duties certainly don’t allow this to be a full-time duty of the WDFW, but seeking out fraud goes a long way to stopping the cheaters.  As Officer Olson states, “Quite honestly all this stuff, it's always about the money.  It's always about the bottom line.”

If you want a “do-it-yourself” guide to finding cheaters, check out this fascinating link.  Professor Erica Cline with the University of Washington-Tacoma has a “Catching Cheaters Salmon Market Substitution Project”, complete with instructor and student’s lab manuals.  Now that's a useful science project.

10/25/2011 - 18:40 0 Read More

KGO-TV, San Francisco’s ABC affiliate ran an excellent story about a current FDA project to supplement the global database “Fish Barcode of Life”.  Pairing taxonomic identifications with unique DNA sequences provides the linkage necessary for regulatory actions on misidentified species.  A positive story about FDA’s efforts to combat species substitution – no gotcha story here, just the facts.

08/30/2011 - 10:44 0 Read More

Welcome to the BSB Blog

You may be asking – Why a blog? Or – How does a blog fight seafood fraud? Well we certainly don’t expect this blog to single-handedly eliminate seafood fraud, but it does provide a collection point for commentary on fraud – in other words, a showcase for the good, the bad and the ugly. It is our way to pass along items of interest that help to educate and persuade the powers that be (whether they be our partners in the seafood supply chain or government agencies) that seafood fraud is very real and needs to be stopped. So check back often to see what we have to say in our fight against seafood fraud.

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INDUSTRY SCOOP

  • 2014 Spring Political Conference
    NFI's Annual Spring Political Conference will be held on May 12-15, 2014 at the St. Regis Washington Hotel. The conference room rate is $385 plus tax. To reserve your sleeping room for the conference, call 1-888-627-8087 and mention National Fisheries Institute to receive the negotiated rate.